Introduction to Programme

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Introduction to Programme 2017-02-21T19:17:43+00:00

Introduction to Programme

The St George’s, University of London MBBS Programme has a well-deserved reputation as  a popular and competitive choice for students applying for medicine.

The graduate entry programme was created in 2000 to attract mature applicants who already had a degree and who had experienced life in the world outside education. The course attracted widespread interest and became quickly recognised across the UK as being pioneering, innovative and cutting edge.

Now the course has been modified and improved – the result of feedback from students and staff over the years. The philosophy behind the course is built around a student-centred approach towards learning in combination with learning through experience. It is problem-based and patient-centred, right from the start of the course.

Clinical and communication skills are given the importance they deserve, simulation being a key teaching aid – whether simulated patients, manikins, or complex state-of-the art computer-based simulations. E-learning is another important learning tool, students having access to the St George’s intranet site and library resources. The scientific basis of medicine is strongly emphasised throughout the course, but particularly in the first two years. The school in Cyprus is equipped with a brand new dissection room to learn anatomy using prosected specimens, imaging, anatomical models and computer-assisted learning.

The first two years of the course take place in Cyprus, the last two years in state-of-the-art hospitals, such as the Swedish Covenant Hospital in Chicago and the Sheba Medical Centre in Tel Aviv. Students will graduate with a degree from St George’s Hospital Medical School, a constituent college of the University of London. This is a truly exciting opportunity for international students to undertake an identical programme, sit the same assessments, and gain the same degree but learn in different, and highly respected, clinical environments. The links between the University of Nicosia and St George’s are strong and fruitful. St George’s faculty and staff make regular visits to Nicosia to observe teaching, participate in assessments, take part in planning meetings and ensure the quality of the course provision. This is an exciting project for our two universities and we look forward to welcoming you on the course.

Peter McCrorie
Dean for Medical Education